Wednesday, June 2, 2010

How do you mark you quilt for quilting? The other day, I was prepping my Stitchers Garden blocks. We have to mark the block and then quilt the background before adding the applique. I had previously used a marker and chalk (and had problems with both coming out). This time I decided to try a Hera Marker.

For this individual block, it worked great! But it is something I can use on something larger and/or darker? I really want to quilt my own quilts. I'm honest with myself though, an artist I'm not. I'm going to need some help and I think that might mean marking quilts for a while.
My Quilts for Kids top is waiting in the wings for me to finish it up. I really want to try and do something other than a meander or straight line quilting.

So if you quilt your quilts, how do you mark them?
I'm really interested in finding out what has worked best for you in your experience!

24 comments:

Trisha said...

I just heard about that tool at a quilt guild meeting. Interesting how it leaves a crease to mark your quilting. When I free motion quilt I don't mark it because I can't for the life of me follow a marked pattern. So I just "draw" with my needle. I am still practicing at getting better at making my stitches even and fluid looking. For straight line quilting I use masking tape and quilt along the edge of it.

Kajsa said...

I have no clue but I think I need one of those markers. Wouldn't it be good to have around when you are finishing things?

Robin (rsislandcrafts) said...

I've heard nothing but good things about the Hera Marker. I haven't tried one yet. I don't mark my quilts right now. I do want to venture out into different designs. Right now I am just meandering or straight stitching so no marking necessary.

Linda said...

In my beginner quiltmaking classes, I encourage my students to use either a chaco-liner or a hera marker to mark a quilt they're going to quilt with a walking foot. After pin-basting, jJust lay a long ruler diagonally (for example) across the quilt and mark along the edge. With a hera marker mark just enough to make one machine stitching pass. Don't mark too far in advance because the crease might rub out. The hera marker works well on light and dark fabrics, but doesn't show well on really busy prints. Use a chaco-liner on those. I avoid the blue washout marker as much as possible after hearing a couple horror stories about that one. My favorite method of marking for free-motion machine quilting is using Golden Threads paper.

Julia said...

I don't quilt, so I can't answer your question. Whatever method you use must work because your work is impeccable! Have you heard of Rachel Clark? She's coming here in Nov. to do a trunk show before our fashion show. I hear she's great.

Bethany said...

I love my Hera Marker. You can see it on dark and light fabrics. It's great for straight lines and gentle curves.

I just use a blue washaway marker. I figure my quilts are meant to be used and I don't worry about 3 generations later cause I'll be dead.

QuiltSue said...

I always used the water soluble blue markers. You do have to be careful though to spritz the marks afterwards with cold water, not warm, and not to let an iron near the marks cos that sets them in. I did try an air-soluble one, but in the middle of a humid heat wave, that was not a good solution. Turn your back for 10 mins and the marks have all disappeared. I have also tried pencil- a heck of a job to get the marks out, chalk -marks rubbed off to easily while I was quilting, the marker you show - never had any luck with that, and pounce-didn't work for me. Opinionated so-and-so aren't I? Sorry.

Margaret said...

As of the last time I was quilting, I still hadn't found a good solution for marking quilts. Maybe that Hera Marker is the way to go!

Annie said...

I've never seen that Hear marker before. Looks interesting, especially for small projects. I don't have an answer for you since I'm not a quilter, but I have the same issues with all the methods of transferring designs for embroidery.

Deb said...

I had seen that tool, but never picked one up. Maybe I should try it, although I definitely don't quilt my own quilts! But I'm sure that it would work for a lot of things so I may have to pick one up.

Littlebit said...

I had to go back a few days to catch up with you! Glad to see you blogging again. Wow, you have been very busy! LOVED the pillowcases and will be making some soon, and I, also, love pink and orange mixed! As for marking a quilt, while I am not a very experienced quilter, "meandering" is my all-time favorite quilting design, and I practiced many hours to get the movement down before actually trying it on the machine--I have done it so much that I don't have to mark. No artist here, either! It's good to see you back, Jackie!

Tonya's Sewing Room said...

I have a hera marker as well, actually I have two different kinds, I like the kind like yours best.

Zlaty said...

Your new marking tool is very interesting, i have to look for it. I am lucky to have a frame for a machine quilting now. I mainly do free motion meandering on the domestic machine.
You can use Golden thread paper and mark your design from a stensil or a book on it and then you pin the paper to the quilt and follow the lines on your machine. i hope this helps!

Happy sewing jackie!

Lori said...

Thanks for posing this question. I'm just starting to quilt my own as well and know I'll tire of the straight line and meander quilting. I've gleaned alot from the comments left.

yarnjourney said...

The best way to mark fabric is an on going dilemma. I like blue water soluble marker too.

Barb said...

I have never seen that before, thanks for the tip...

belinda said...

Hhhmmmm...I've seen this but not used one....I use a marker that has the blue on one end that dissappears with water...the other end marks purple that dissappears with just the air in around 12 hours....I prefer the purple...goes away on it's own...the only thing...don't mark too much at a time...if you don't get it quilted is goes away and you have to mark it again...LOL...this happens to me a lot!!!

Vicki said...

I have used blue markers, silver marking pencils, soapstone ,etc. I decided that I don't like marked quilting any more and I do exclusivley free hand designs. It is so liberating!!! And I can express myself without limitations. Try it!

Kim D. said...

Someone at our guild showed the Hera Marker and it looks great. I'm with Belinda on the purple marker. It disappears too quickly. I marked a quilt one night and got up the next morning to quilt it and the markings were gone. I was so frustrated. I use the blue marker so it lasts longer.
A well known award winning quilter told me about two methods for removing the blue marker if it doesn't come out. The trick is to use baking soda and water. Use a tooth brush and it supposedly works wonders. She soaks it in the bathtub to get the marker out. You can also use one part water with 3 parts rubbing alchohol and a few drops of palmolive dish soap. I haven't used the alchohol solution yet, that one scares me a little. But if I were desperate I might try it. I've had good luck with getting the blue marker out with water, but just in case.

I've had several people tell me the baking soda method does the trick for getting out the blue marker, so I'm not as worried as I was before.

Micki said...

I have the hera marker and it is wonderful.Good luck with your quilting...I know you will do great!
Micki

Candace said...

Jackie - have you looked at the Pounce method? It's a powder that you "wipe" over a stencil, then it comes off with your iron! Go to www.fullLinestencil.com. I've used this several times along with your Hera Marker and just plain drawing on a design with a marking pencil!
Cheers!

Simone de Klerk said...

I have this too and it works perfectley!

Suzanne said...

This is a neat tool.

Kate said...

I've always been too terrified to mark my quilt; I'd be crushed if it didnt come out. For detailed patterns (ie. not stipple) I use tracing paper, which I explain here: http://kates-in-stitches.blogspot.com/2008/09/quilt-marking.html